Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice

Title

Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice

Identifier

https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i2.42

Description

Abstract:

Archives as memory institutions have a collective mandate to document and preserve a national cultural heritage. Recently, American archives and archivists have come under fire for pervasive homogeneity - for privileging, preserving, and reproducing a history that is predominantly white and further silencing the voices and histories of marginalized peoples and communities. This paper argues that as such, archives participate in a continuing amnesty that prevents transitional and restorative justice for black Americans in the United States. Using the history of lynching in America as a backdrop, this article explores the records and counter-narratives archives need to embrace in order to support truth and reconciliation processes for black Americans in the age of #ArchivesForBlackLives.

Subject

Racial Justice

Creator

Sutherland, Tonia

Source

"Critical Archival Studies,” eds. Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand. Special issue, Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 2 (2017).

Date

2017

Rights

CC BY-NC

Language

English

Type

Text

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Comments

Citation

Sutherland, Tonia, “Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice,” Anti-Racism Digital Library, accessed August 4, 2020, https://sacred.omeka.net/items/show/336.