Caste, Class, and Race: A Study in Social Dynamics by Oliver Cromwell Cox (New York, Doubleday, 1948)

Title

Caste, Class, and Race: A Study in Social Dynamics by Oliver Cromwell Cox (New York, Doubleday, 1948)

Identifier

https://www.worldcat.org/title/caste-class-and-race/oclc/504317476

A full text copy of the book republished by Monthly Review Press, NY, is available from: https://archive.org/details/casteclassracest00coxo

Description

xvii, 672 pages. To download a digital copy of the 1959 edition or to browse online go to: https://archive.org/details/casteclassracest00coxo

Contents:
Preface
Introduction
Prologue
Part 1:
Caste
Part 2: Class
Part 3: Race - begins with a chapter on The Concept - Race Relations and the closing chapter is The Race Problem in the United States.
Bibliography
Index

Book Reviews, Arranged in Reverse Chronological Order i.e. most recent first

Barbara Celarent (2010) ‘Caste, Class, and Race by Oliver Cromwell Cox’, American Journal of Sociology, 115 (5). (pdf) [Barbara Celarent is a pseudonym of Andrew Abbott.]

Adolph Reed Jr (2001) ‘Race and Class in the Work of Oliver Cromwell Cox’ Monthly Review 52(9), February 2001.

John Holmwood 'Caste Class and Race' In Global Social Theory. The book Caste, Class and Race: A Study in Social Dynamics by the Trinidadian born, US-based scholar Oliver Cromwell Cox is a major work of sociological theory and secondary analysis. It is hard to do justice to a book of over six hundred pages of meticulous scholarship. It, stands out as a landmark of sociological analysis that defies intellectual categorisation and exists alongside Weber’s Economy and Society as a classic of the field, sadly neglected compared to the latter, but ultimately surpassing it in terms of its analysis of the concepts of caste, class and race. Published in 1948 it was written in response to an emerging interest in (white) sociology in understanding race in the US through the lens of ‘caste’, as was proposed by Gunnar Myrdal in his American Dilemma (1944). While other Black academics – including those who worked with Myrdal, such as Ralph Bunche – preferred the language of class analysis to Myrdal’s preferred language of caste, it was left to Cox to provide a detailed examination of caste, class and race that went beyond rebuttal to provide a systematic sociological examination of the different systems of caste, class and race and the intersections among them. Continue reading at Global Social Theory

Creator

Oliver Cromwell Cox

Social Bookmarking

Collection

Citation

Oliver Cromwell Cox, “Caste, Class, and Race: A Study in Social Dynamics by Oliver Cromwell Cox (New York, Doubleday, 1948),” Anti-Racism Digital Library, accessed November 11, 2019, https://sacred.omeka.net/items/show/255.